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Therefore, even though Enceladus is only Saturn's sixth-largest moon, it is amazingly active. Because of the success of the Cassini mission, scientists now know that geysers spew watery jets hundreds of kilometers out into Space, originating from what may well be a vast subsurface sea. These jets, which erupt from fissures in the little moon's icy shell, whisper a siren's song to bewitched astronomers. This is because the jets suggest that the icy moon may harbor a zone where life might have evolved. The jets dramatically spray water ice from numerous fissures near the south pole, that have been playfully termed "tiger stripes." The "tiger stripes" look like giant scratches made by a tiger's raking claws.



Saturn, the smaller of the two gas-giant planets inhabiting our Solar System, is an enchanting world. It is dwarfed only by Jupiter, the larger gas-giant planet, and it is probably the most beautiful planet in our Solar System. Magical and mysterious, Saturn's lovely rings and tumbling moonlets of ice, evoke wonder in the eye of the beholder.



During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on October 28, 2015, it detected molecular hydrogen as the spacecraft zipped through the plume of ice grains and gas spraying out from cracks slashing though the icy crust of the moon-world. Earlier flybys provided hints that a global subsurface ocean did, indeed, exist, sloshing around above a rocky core. Molecular hydrogen in the plumes could indicate hydrothermal processes, which could play the important role of providing the chemical energy so necessary to support life as we know it. In order to hunt for hydrogen specifically originating on Enceladus, the spacecraft dived particularly close to the strange slashed surface.