Asteroid with Rings Planet jupiter with asteroid ring motion background storyblocks Planet with Asteroid Rings

Asteroid with Rings Planet jupiter with asteroid ring motion background storyblocks Planet with Asteroid Rings

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Asteroid with Rings Planet

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Once in a blue moon. Technically, it takes the moon an average of 29.53 days to travel around the earth. Most months are longer than this. So, it is possible to have more than one full moon in one month. When this happens, the second moon is called a "calendar blue moon." Of course, this is a simple rule. So, let's complicate it!



What is a New Moon? The moon goes through different phases, in fact there are eight different phases all told with the new moon being the first phase (No, there is no 'old' moon phase). When the sun and the moon have an equal ecliptic longitude it appears that the moon just 'disappears'. This is because during the new moon phase the moon is on the same side of the Earth as the Sun, causing the dark side of the moon to face our planet. More accurately, during the new moon phase it's hidden behind the sun from sunrise to sunset giving us the impression that it has disappeared.



In September 2015, a team of astronomers released their study showing that they have detected regions on the far side of the Moon--called the lunar highlands--that may bear the scars of this ancient heavy bombardment. This vicious attack, conducted primarily by an invading army of small asteroids, smashed and shattered the lunar upper crust, leaving behind scarred regions that were as porous and fractured as they could be. The astronomers found that later impacts, crashing down onto the already heavily battered regions caused by earlier bombarding asteroids, had an opposite effect on these porous regions. Indeed, the later impacts actually sealed up the cracks and decreased porosity.