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At last, on July 1, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft fired off its breaking rocket, glided into orbit around Saturn, and started taking pictures that left scientists in awe. It wasn't as if they hadn't been prepared for such wonders. The weeks leading up to Cassini's arrival at Saturn had served to intensify their already heated anticipation. It seemed as if each approach-picture taken was more enticing than the one preceding it.



From these observations planetary scientists were able to determine that almost 98% of the gas in the plume is water, about 1% is hydrogen, and the rest is a combination of other molecules that include methane, ammonia, and carbon dioxide.



"Hydrogen is a source of chemical energy for microbes that live in the Earth's oceans near hydrothermal vents. Our results indicate the same chemical energy source is present in the ocean of Enceladus. We have not found evidence of the presence of microbial life in the ocean of Enceladus, but the discovery of hydrogen gas and the evidence for ongoing hydrothermal activity offer a tantalizing suggestion that habitable conditions could exist beneath the moon's icy crust," explained Dr. Hunter Waite in an April 13, 2017 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Press Release. Dr. Waite is principal investigator of Cassini's Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS), and lead author of the paper titled Cassini Finds Molecular Hydrogen in the Enceladus Plume: Evidence for Hydrothermal Processes. The SwRI is in San Antonio, Texas.