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Space Suit Helmet Walk Photos

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The astronomers then conducted an analysis called a Bouger correction in order to subtract the gravitational effect of topological features, such as valleys and mountains, from the total gravity field. What is then left is the gravity field hidden beneath the lunar surface, existing within its crust.



We live in a Cosmic "shooting gallery". Objects inhabiting our Solar System have been profusely and mercilessly blasted by showering asteroids and comets for billions and billions of years. However, planets and large moons have their way of smoothing away the scars--their strong gravity pulls them into a nice ball-like spherical shape. Furthermore, some of these larger spheres possess sufficient internal heat to cause flows of fiery lava and other volcanic features that can fill in the scars of impact craters. A few such large bodies are blasted by strong winds and pouring rains, which also erode away the pockmarks left on their surfaces by showering impactors.



The moon's orbit. The moon's orbit is not on the same plane as the earth's orbit around the sun. If it were, every time we had a new moon we would have a solar eclipse, and every time we had a full moon we would have a lunar eclipse. Instead, the moon travels in a track that goes well above and well below the earth. Still, on occasion it will travel in between the sun and the earth and in this case, there will be an eclipse.